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Post Info TOPIC: "The willing suspension of disbelief"


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"The willing suspension of disbelief"
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is a fine old phrase, but with me the matter is more "the unwilling suspension of disbelief." I am more enthralled by a book that has drawn me in such that I am gradually aware that I meant to be cautious in my reading....but then there's this lump in my throat.....

-- Edited by jaimesan3 on Thursday 17th of February 2011 02:08:20 PM

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RE: "The willing suspension of disbelief"
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Please give an example of a book that does that to you?  I'm not sure I understand this quite intellectual post.smile

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"The willing suspension of disbelief"
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"Intellectual?" I don't think so. It's an old saying that sort of cleverly states a quality of a story, a satifying story--a "good, compelling  read."  If the story is told in a way that disarms you, keeps you turning pages, even if the topic, characters or story may contain elements that caused you to raise an eyebrow and think, well, "that's been done,"or "That's unrealistic, unscientific, implausible, wtc"  you feel drawn, even compelled to keep reading despite your personal bent to be more skeptical.....
[One example in the interes of space{ Thomas Harris's Red Dragom]

You end up with both eyebrows raised, almost surprised and gratified I think to have let your natural suspicion take a break and let you finish a story because it was so well crafted--Another old saying: "It's the treatment, not the subject that counts."

With a grizzled old veteran reader like me--who also is a fairly serious scribbler, and have been for  many years--you have to show me some serious story-telling chops to keep my interest. Especially if it's genre literature, where formulaic plots and stereotype characters abound, there had got to be some differences, some twists and nuances that overcome the formulaic mystery, adventure, cop story, rags-to-riches or serial killer saga to practically hogtie and disable my normally skeptical reading practices.



-- Edited by jaimesan3 on Tuesday 22nd of February 2011 02:13:24 PM

-- Edited by jaimesan3 on Tuesday 22nd of February 2011 02:16:39 PM

-- Edited by jaimesan3 on Tuesday 22nd of February 2011 02:20:42 PM

__________________

 The cat: He walked by himself, and all the places were alike to him.

(R. Kipling)

 

 



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RE: "The willing suspension of disbelief"
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Thank you for the explanation jaimee.  I know now what you mean....there are some books that I don't want to end because I've become so fond of the characters and story.  I've not read anything really really good for a long time. 
The last book that moved me was the Denis LeHane book you recommended.
The Given Day.  By the way, LeHane has a new book out a sequel to "Gone, baby, Gone"
http://www.dennislehanebooks.com/books/

Mostly, I've been reading detective mysteries by Michael Connelly, John Sanford and the like. Makes winter go faster.

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Re-examine all that you have been told... dismiss that which insults your soul.
Walt Whitman

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