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Grand Chute, Wisconsin

 

 

The French gave Grand Chute its name by referring to the large rapids in the lower  Fox River as la grande chute when directing other travelers to the area. Grand Chute was established on April 3, 1849 in Brown County.



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Honduras

honduras_3022_600x450.jpg



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Imalone, WI

 

Billboard, atop a 20-story building along Broadway in the Herald Square area of Midtown Manhattan

 

The community was established by Snowball Anderson, who built a gas station in the area. The origin of the community's name is uncertain. According to one story, while Anderson's station was being run by Bill Granger, a salesman asked for the name of the place to use on an invoice. Granger replied, "I'm alone," meaning he could not ask what the name was, and the salesman wrote "Imalone" on the invoice. Another explanation states that Anderson named the community Imalone "because he was."



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Jakarta, Indonesia



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Kaukauna, Wisconsin

 

 

Over the years it has had many names: Kakalin, Cacolin, Cau Caulin, Kackaloo, Grand Kaukaulin, Grande Coquiller Rapides. The name derives from the Menominee Indian word "Ogag-kane," meaning "the stopping place of the pike," or "O-Gau-Gau-Ning," "the stopping place of the Pickerel.



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Loch Ness, Scotland



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KittyBiggerstaff wrote:


 



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Merritt Island, FL



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    New London, Wisconsin

 

  

Established in 1852 and named for New London, Connecticut, the birthplace of the father of Reeder Smith, one of the city developers as well as the builder of the plank road between Appleton and Stevens Point.

 


 



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Olympia, Washington



-- Edited by KittyBiggerstaff on Saturday 10th of September 2011 07:58:20 PM

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Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana



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Queens, NY...site of the 1964-65 World's Fair...

 

Charlie



-- Edited by KidCharlieMane on Monday 5th of February 2018 01:24:58 PM

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I went to that World's Fair!

 

Rotterdam, Netherlands



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Swansea, Wales

(Don't mind me, I just love the name.)



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Turtle Lake, Wisconsin

 

 

The Village of Turtle Lake's history dates back to 1875 with its first settlers of European descent.  Stephen Richardson was attracted to the area because of the vast hardwoods and pine forests.  Mr. Richardson named the area Skowhagen after his hometown in Maine.  During the first years that the Richardson family was here the settlement consisted of Native Americans by about half.  By 1879, Richardson erected a saw mill, Turtle Lake's first and principal industry for a number of years, and its first business, a general store that was later sold to L.M. Richardson.  A post office was also established in 1879 with Stephen Richardson as postmaster.

Before Turtle Lake was established, Knapp Stout Lumber Company had several logging camps on both shores of Upper and Lower Turtle Lake.  The lakes were named by government surveyors because of all the turtles seen depositing their eggs on the shores.



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Sunovabitch, hardly any photos of mine are showing in either this thread or the Hardware Store one tonight.  They seem OK over at Photobucket.  confuse

Umatilla, FL

population - 2200 in 2010, probably a few more now

Umatilla, the Gateway to the Ocala National Forest, is located in northern Lake County, Florida and offers many outdoor activities such as boating, fishing, camping and hiking. Nearby Alexander Springs features the southern end of the Florida Trail, an unpaved hiking trail 60 miles long.

Umatilla was founded in 1856 by Nathan J. Trowell. The name was taken from an Oregon town of the same name, an Indian name meaning "laughing waters."  The area was incorporated on November 8, 1904.

fl trail gateway community

The City of Umatilla is proud to be designated as a Gateway Community of the Florida Trail Association.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just in case I can get a photo to show up--

vacation rentals

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQBe00wwkgaSK8BNheS-EvkJh-loIDsCVMfz5BrK-NR71YSVPF8Hw

 



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Valhalla  smile



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So that's where that photo was taken!  Someone sent it to me years ago, and it just looked so eldritch at twilight.  I find an excuse to post it every autumn.

Xayaburi, Laos



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Nope...I went back and compared yours to mine...the buildings aren't the same, as I first thought they were. Neither is the treeline.

Go back and look at your photo...your building is smaller and hasn't got the peaked roof, either. Perhaps they were taken in different decades...there IS a Sunfrost truck in your image.

Either the photos were taken in different eras...or the truck was just making a delivery at another local stand.

Sunfrost does have a juice bar, though...so maybe they have two stores, in different locations or different towns in Upstate NY.

YPSILANTI, MICHIGAN...(Ip-suh-LAN-tee)

Often shortened to "Ypsi" (IP-see)...

Has a neighborhood known as "Ypsitucky"...

(because of its many auto workers from the Appalachians)

Also the home of Eastern Michigan University...



Charlie



-- Edited by KidCharlieMane on Monday 5th of February 2018 01:25:49 PM

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Zoe, KY

 

zoe.jpg

 

"About a mile east of us was what passed for the local school. It also doubled as a meeting place for the church people. Just before we came down there, one of the smouldering feuds erupted during one of the "meetings", and one of the men was shot dead. A little farther on was the town of Zoe, containing a single general store and postoffice. I just wish that store could have been preserved for posterity. Just picture a typical country store, and then overlay it with the demands of an oilfield frontier, and it may give you some idea of what it was like. We got all our mail and most of our groceries from there, and we usually reached it via a footpath, as it was usually better than the road.

The road ran from the railhead at Torrent to the County seat of Lee County, Beatyville. That portion of the road over which the heavy equipment for the oilfield was hauled was always in abominable condition, due largely to the springs that could not be avoided when the road was laid out. Small mudholes quickly became large ones, and in one in which more than one spring was involved, at the "town" of Zachariah, the mudhole was a quarter mile long, and was so deep that a team of six mules was drowned in it, trying to haul a wagon loaded with a boiler thru. They brot in a string of oxen and snaked the wagon out, then hitched the oxen onto it, and they pulled it thru. That will give you an idea of some of the difficulties encountered in maintaining an oi1field in this difficult terrain.

Another "road" incident that still remains vividly in my memory involves the hauling of nitroglycerine, which was used to "shoot" wells to fracture the rock structure at the bottom of the holes. It was usually stored in "magazines", small sheds tucked far back in the woods. When needed, a wagon would load up and take it to the desired location. Sometimes the cans were stored over an extended time before any was needed. Naturally, it was difficult to find men who were willing to take such a risky job. But premium pay was able to lure some men to do such work. Being conscious of the extreme risks involved, especially over the oilfield roads, they fortified themselves for the task by getting rip-roaring drunk.

One day some of us kids were playing in our front yard when a "nitro" wagon rolled slowly by. It was pulled by four mules and two lead horses. It was very evident that the two men on the wagon were "fortified". But as the wagon passed by, I noticed liquid dripping from the back end of the wagon. I guessed what it probably was, but there was nothing I could do about it, so I let it pass. About two hours later a tremendous blast toward the west shook the earth and rattled some dishes in the cupboard. When papa arrived home, he, mama, Ruth and I walked about three miles west, and came upon the spot where the nitro wagon had blown up. They had been carrying six hundred quarts of nitroglycerine, one or more of the cans had been leaking, and they were on a portion of the road where ledges of rock outcropped across the road. A sudden sharp jolt was probably all it took. It excavated a hole in the ground about eight feet deep and perhaps twenty feet across. The force of the blast veered off to the east, stripping the forest of leaves and small branches for a considerable distance. Searchers were able to find a cigar box full of mixed human and mule remains for burial."

http://home.comcast.net/~adhopkins/dadhist.htm



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