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Post Info TOPIC: Anyone else read mysteries writtten by authers in Britain...


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Anyone else read mysteries writtten by authers in Britain...
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I have always been amazed at the British mysteries and love them. Especially their slang and sayings. Always spot on with a bit of humour  right on time as  I read their thrillers. I love the settings of rainy London to the beaches and high cliff hangers. The oozing fog swirling and changing shapes you thought were there, then gone  in the blink of an eye. So I was reading one of such books last week and I came across a sentence-"Watch the Ha-Ha as you go."  I am hoping Booswell will know but anyone can answer would be greatly appreciated. This reference to the Ha-Ha was written three time in the book but I just could  not get the jest of it.

Thank you kindly in advance,biggrin

Uni

P.S. I will leave this up to Nytram if he would like to put this thread under the appropriate board topic.smile

 



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As far as I know, a "ha-ha" is a sort of fence in fields and pastures.

Yes, I probably learned that while reading one of Agatha Christie's mysteries, long before A&E started its PrimeTimeCrimeTime summer of 1998 (or maybe it started a bit earlier)--anyway, all those wonderful mysteries by Dame Agatha and a lot of other British authors were something to look forward to every evening and even got Eddie and me to finally get online (OK, it was dial-up back then, but it worked well enough).

And then that autumn, A&E started replacing the Brit Mysts with "Murder, She Wrote."  Not many of us were happy about that.  Not that we probably hadn't watched MSW regularly, but it simply wasn't teddibly British, I daresay.



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Years ago when I read more, I went through all of Christie's works and others, but that was a long time ago. I'm afraid I don't read much at all anymore. So much easier to do a crossword while watching TV :)

I do love a lot of British shows and some from Canada, Australia and even New Zealand so last year I signed up for the streaming service ACORN. At $6/month it is a real bargain.

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Thank you Kitty. Now it could mean a Haha is a fence. As I recall the folks in the story were directed down this huge driveway by the owner of the huge estate and which led towards the "haha". But that would make sense. I thought it meant a large ditch. But that  definition did not quite make sense.confuse 

Oh A&E and Mr. Curtis just ruined the programing. I am sure millions of people turned in at one time of the day or the other to watch at least one or more of the British mysteries every day. Yes Murder she wrote was a good series. I have 6 books of hers. They were give to me by a friend. I have to admit with the show they sure introduced many actors I had  not seen in a number of years. So they were interesting to see after so many years had passed.

I keep hoping one of the  stations will pick up Sherlock Holmes starring Jeremy Brett, my favourite. I do like the movies Robert Downy JR and the actor Jude Law who played Watson.   There was also another British show called "Sherlock" and it is really well done in its own way. I believe it lasted 3 seasons but for some reason Season three was not available here. I  also watch the new series "Elementary" filmed in  New York City. Lucy Lu plays Joan Watson . Its pretty good and different seeing a female play Watson.

Take care and thank you for help on the reference of "haha"

Uni



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Enchanted_Unicorn wrote:

Thank you Kitty. Now it could mean a Haha is a fence. As I recall the folks in the story were directed down this huge driveway by the owner of the huge estate and which led towards the "haha". But that would make sense. I thought it meant a large ditch. But that  definition did not quite make sense.confuse 

Oh A&E and Mr. Curtis just ruined the programing. I am sure millions of people turned in at one time of the day or the other to watch at least one or more of the British mysteries every day. Yes Murder she wrote was a good series. I have 6 books of hers. They were give to me by a friend. I have to admit with the show they sure introduced many actors I had  not seen in a number of years. So they were interesting to see after so many years had passed.

I keep hoping one of the  stations will pick up Sherlock Holmes starring Jeremy Brett, my favourite. I do like the movies Robert Downy JR and the actor Jude Law who played Watson.   There was also another British show called "Sherlock" and it is really well done in its own way. I believe it lasted 3 seasons but for some reason Season three was not available here. I  also watch the new series "Elementary" filmed in  New York City. Lucy Lu plays Joan Watson . Its pretty good and different seeing a female play Watson.

Take care and thank you for help on the reference of "haha"

Uni


 As Kitty said Uni, but it also means a bower made up of rose bushes, ornamental hedges and the like and in the detective stories tends to be where courting couples are discovered by the hero or heroine.

All the Sherlock Holmes, Sherlock, Miss Fisher Murder Mysteries and the like are on Pirate Bay etc. Downloading is not illegal, although the sites tend to get blocked early in the week when the powers that be try to stop the punters viewing the latest shows.



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Anyone else read mysteries writtten by authers in Britain...
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Enchanted_Unicorn wrote:

P.S. I will leave this up to Nytram if he would like to put this thread under the appropriate board topic.smile 


You're fine. I usually wait until a post is drifting off the first page before I relocate it.

smile



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Anyone else read mysteries writtten by authers in Britain...
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boosewell wrote:

 

Enchanted_Unicorn wrote:

Thank you Kitty. Now it could mean a Haha is a fence. As I recall the folks in the story were directed down this huge driveway by the owner of the huge estate and which led towards the "haha". But that would make sense. I thought it meant a large ditch. But that  definition did not quite make sense.confuse 

Oh A&E and Mr. Curtis just ruined the programing. I am sure millions of people turned in at one time of the day or the other to watch at least one or more of the British mysteries every day. Yes Murder she wrote was a good series. I have 6 books of hers. They were give to me by a friend. I have to admit with the show they sure introduced many actors I had  not seen in a number of years. So they were interesting to see after so many years had passed.

I keep hoping one of the  stations will pick up Sherlock Holmes starring Jeremy Brett, my favourite. I do like the movies Robert Downy JR and the actor Jude Law who played Watson.   There was also another British show called "Sherlock" and it is really well done in its own way. I believe it lasted 3 seasons but for some reason Season three was not available here. I  also watch the new series "Elementary" filmed in  New York City. Lucy Lu plays Joan Watson . Its pretty good and different seeing a female play Watson.

Take care and thank you for help on the reference of "haha"

Uni


 As Kitty said Uni, but it also means a bower made up of rose bushes, ornamental hedges and the like and in the detective stories tends to be where courting couples are discovered by the hero or heroine.

All the Sherlock Holmes, Sherlock, Miss Fisher Murder Mysteries and the like are on Pirate Bay etc. Downloading is not illegal, although the sites tend to get blocked early in the week when the powers that be try to stop the punters viewing the latest shows.


 

_______________________ Thank you so much Kitty and Bossewell. Now it makes more sense. I just thought it was funny to hear this description from the higher ups in the novel who reside in a Mansion.  Actually these Haha's sound lovely. I love roses but have never had a luck with them back in my gardening days. Boosewell I cannot watch any movies on my computer. As it is my eyes are sensitive to artificial light and after spending an hour so on line I find my eyes start to water. Good to hear you are enjoying the early peek at what is coming up. Take care, Uni



-- Edited by Enchanted_Unicorn on Friday 4th of May 2018 03:45:54 PM

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nytram wrote:
Enchanted_Unicorn wrote:

P.S. I will leave this up to Nytram if he would like to put this thread under the appropriate board topic.smile 


You're fine. I usually wait until a post is drifting off the first page before I relocate it.

smile


 Sounds good Cap't.aww

Take care,

Uni



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Oops! Kitty I forgot all about Agatha Christie in my earlier post...
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She is an excellent author and I was first introduced to her book when I was just starting in high school.  And so was my love over the years for a good mystery. I can recall not able to pronounce Hercule  Poirot. The Librarian was kind enough to help me figure out the pronunciation. 

She is definitely at the top of my list for the best mysteries I have ever read coming from Britain. She is Queen. Yes?

Uni



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Enchanted_Unicorn wrote:

She is an excellent author and I was first introduced to her book when I was just starting in high school.  And so was my love over the years for a good mystery. I can recall not able to pronounce Hercule  Poirot. The Librarian was kind enough to help me figure out the pronunciation. 

She is definitely at the top of my list for the best mysteries I have ever read coming from Britain. She is Queen. Yes?

Uni


I didn't know how to pronounce "Hercule Poirot" when I read the first few stories about him.  I took Spanish in high school, not French.  Every time I read his name, I probably turned it into something like "Her coolie Poi (that Hawaiian staple) Rot," but I surely enjoyed the stories.

Dame Agatha is, was, and forever shall be the Queen of Myteries!! 



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You might like to give Stephen Booth a try.  He writes about murder and intrigue in the Derbyshire Dales.  Stories centre around a Detective Inspector named Ben Cooper and the writing is terrific.  All sorts of "characters" on the police force, office game-playing, Ben's interactions with his fellow co-workers and some very strange situations and crimes to be solved.  I think Mr. Booth is up to his 16th novel in this series, so it would be best to start with No. 1.  I've read them all and I think they're great.



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KittyBiggerstaff wrote:
Enchanted_Unicorn wrote:

She is an excellent author and I was first introduced to her book when I was just starting in high school.  And so was my love over the years for a good mystery. I can recall not able to pronounce Hercule  Poirot. The Librarian was kind enough to help me figure out the pronunciation. 

She is definitely at the top of my list for the best mysteries I have ever read coming from Britain. She is Queen. Yes?

Uni


I didn't know how to pronounce "Hercule Poirot" when I read the first few stories about him.  I took Spanish in high school, not French.  Every time I read his name, I probably turned it into something like "Her coolie Poi (that Hawaiian staple) Rot," but I surely enjoyed the stories.

Dame Agatha is, was, and forever shall be the Queen of Myteries!! 


 I suspect that the girl to see on that one Kitty, is Uni.

Hercule Poirot was a Belgian and his French was a long way from the Parisian dialect that old Rosenthal tried to flog into me at school. In fact, he may well have spoken Walloon, which is popular in parts of Canada and almost unintelligent to anyone outside the country.

Of course, since the real grafters in Belgium are considered to be the Flemish, Hercule's first language might be Dutch.  



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mjd wrote:

You might like to give Stephen Booth a try.  He writes about murder and intrigue in the Derbyshire Dales.  Stories centre around a Detective Inspector named Ben Cooper and the writing is terrific.  All sorts of "characters" on the police force, office game-playing, Ben's interactions with his fellow co-workers and some very strange situations and crimes to be solved.  I think Mr. Booth is up to his 16th novel in this series, so it would be best to start with No. 1.  I've read them all and I think they're great.


 Hi Emjay. I have written his name down in my personal book I keep for Author names and titles. I am sure I will enjoy his works. He  sounds like a good read. I plan on hitting the library on Thursday. smile

Thank you so much,

Uni



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