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Post Info TOPIC: Guide to making tea.


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Guide to making tea.
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Guide to making tea.
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Now THAT is funny! I have done that so many times!
And then I end up drinking cold tea, unless I nuke it in the microwave.

Charlie





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KidCharlieMane wrote:

Now THAT is funny! I have done that so many times!
And then I end up drinking cold tea, unless I nuke it in the microwave.

Charlie :twocents;


 You are not alone Charlie. I have done it too many times to count them.awwawwawwaww Now I do not feel so bad now.

Uni



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I loved tea, hot or iced, as long it was loaded with sugar, until after I graduated high school and discovered coffee.  From kindergarten on, I always had a cup of tea with my single slice of cinnamon toast for breakfast (I've never been one for breakfast).  I hated white milk (still do), as we all know by now, so Grandma filled my thermos bottle with iced tea every school morning.  She'd make one big pitcher of iced tea and one of chocolate milk.  I looked forward to the latter when I got home from school.

Once I was old enough to dunk a tea bag in a cup of hot water, I quickly learned to yank it out as soon as the rosy-amber color was achieved.  Otherwise, it was bitter and nasty.  In my early days at the Grands' place, Grandma used loose tea leaves in a teapot, poured the tea through a strainer into cups, then pretended to "read" the leaves.  She was very good at making up stories.  aww



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KittyBiggerstaff wrote:

I loved tea, hot or iced, as long it was loaded with sugar, until after I graduated high school and discovered coffee.  From kindergarten on, I always had a cup of tea with my single slice of cinnamon toast for breakfast (I've never been one for breakfast).  I hated white milk (still do), as we all know by now, so Grandma filled my thermos bottle with iced tea every school morning.  She'd make one big pitcher of iced tea and one of chocolate milk.  I looked forward to the latter when I got home from school.

Once I was old enough to dunk a tea bag in a cup of hot water, I quickly learned to yank it out as soon as the rosy-amber color was achieved.  Otherwise, it was bitter and nasty.  In my early days at the Grands' place, Grandma used loose tea leaves in a teapot, poured the tea through a strainer into cups, then pretended to "read" the leaves.  She was very good at making up stories.  aww


Despite losing a parent at a very early age, it sounds like you had a good childhood.

A bit spartan, but still good. And you were treated like a Queen!

Well...maybe a Princess...

Charlie



-- Edited by KidCharlieMane on Monday 3rd of September 2018 07:16:42 PM

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Thanks, Charlie. aww

Life at the Grands' place wasn't anywhere near Spartan--although, come to consider it, I might have thought it so had I been older and acquainted with world history, which I wasn't, so it was all not so bad.  It was quite small and cramped, compared to our Trenton house.  The property surrounding it, as it went uphill, was vast, well, at least in comparison.  What counted the most was I never lacked affection nor attention.

I suppose the most difficult part of the transition was the Grands' being ferociously frugal compared to my Trenton days of Daddy's uninhibited largesse.

I also suppose that unless we experience tight times, we can't truly appreciate better ones.



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I guess i should have said "frugal" and not "Spartan"...wrong word choice, and you neither lived in Michigan nor attended Michigan State.

Charlie

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Commander, Consolation Prize

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No, but I was conceived in Traverse City, Michigan.  That should count! biggrin



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